The Value of Reviews

five star reviews

 

I cannot tell you how important reviews of your book, especially your first one, are. They are an author’s lifeline, and the review builds the author’s reputation and the value of her work.

Two ARC readers have shared their reviews so far, and I am going to share them here with you:

A cancer patient, a stolen icon, a Greek Islands vacation and an unexpected romance all come together in Dorothy Robey’s debut novel.

With her nephew lying in a hospital bed, Marina’s mother sends her on a mission of mercy to retrieve the family icon, famous for its healing properties. But when she arrives in Greece, Marina finds the icon is missing. Unsure of who to trust, Marina races against the clock to find the lost heirloom before it’s too late.

In Passage of Promise, the author’s writing pulled me into her world and kept me reading. I loved the familial thread in the story. The health problem was heart wrenching and realistic and helped me to engage with the characters. The mystery kept me turning pages until the end.

(full review available on Goodreads)

 

AND:

 
Can a single woman alone in Greece find her great-grandmother’s miraculous, healing icon that her family desperately needs, before it’s too late? Moreover, can this same woman find the something inside herself that she’s been missing, before she loses herself?

And what about the American English teacher she meets on her journey? Is he the man she has been looking for, or will he just cause her more pain?

Marina Sutton’s adult life had not been easy—a horrible track record with men, an overbearing mother constantly reminding her of her faults, a sister she is no longer close to, and a nephew with a life-threatening illness. The only light in her life seems to be Yiayia – her devout, Greek Orthodox grandmother.

This book is full of excitement, love and hope. The twists and turns of the story only reflect what is happening inside Marina. While she is searching for the icon her family needs, she is also searching within herself to find the faith she lost long ago.

Travel with Marina to Greece – see the sights, feel the salty breeze, taste the local cuisine, and experience the beauty of the Orthodox Church.

What a fun journey. I highly recommend this book, and I cannot wait to read Dorothy Robey’s future works.

 

As that old saying goes, my cup runneth over. I’m so grateful to these dear people for their thoughtful, insightful, and beautiful reviews, the last of which had me in tears. God gave me such a gift, and He’s guided me through my writing and all the processes involved in the craft. Thank you, Lord.

Fellow writers out there who haven’t published your work yet. Keep at it. Endure until the end. 🙂 Acquire ARC readers, followed by many other readers for your great work and feel the many blessings.

 

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Chills and Thrills — Author Christopher Greyson’s Riveting Novel, The Girl Who Lived

book reviews image of stack of books and tea cup

Okay, folks. It’s time for a book review. A SHORT one.

I finished reading Christopher Greyson’s suspense thriller, The Girl Who Lived, last week.

Just an FYI, suspense thrillers aren’t genres I read on a regular basis, but they are in my reading mix, along with women’s fiction, classics, and at times, historical fiction.

From the few suspense thrillers I’ve read recently, Greyson’s novel is a big winner and eclipses the last one I read called Wave of Terror. Only once throughout that novel did I feel a bit of tension/thrill.

So, why was Greyson’s novel a winner? Because…

  • His story drew me in, in the first line, paragraph, and page of his novel.
  • His writing style is solid, good.
  • Whoever edits and proofreads his manuscripts is a stellar human being. I don’t recall seeing any typos or errors of any kind.
  • I could barely put the book down. I forced myself to set the book aside so that I had the majority of the book to read on my vacation. And I did finish it while sitting out on our cabin’s porch in Estes Park, enjoying the absolutely perfect weather.
  • He wrote so well, his suspenseful scenes, quite a few, had me tensing and on the edge of my seat, so to speak, and one scene actually gave me the chills. Now THAT’S what I call a true THRILLER. 🙂
  • He kept me guessing with many twists and turns up until practically the end, on who was involved in Faith’s family and friends’ murders.
  • Lastly, a great bonus. His writing is quite clean with regards to language and sex. The violence is somewhat graphic, but not enough that I’d need to skip over parts. They were just enough to get the point across. Clean, gritty, realistic, and sharp storyline, plot, and good fleshed-out characters.
  • I had a moment of a pinch of disappointment in who was behind the murders, as I had people in mind, but at the same time, all info explaining why that person and how was plausible and believable enough that in the end, I was satisfied.

Here’s the blurb on The Girl Who Lived:

Ten years ago, four people were brutally murdered. One girl lived.

No one believes her story.
The police think she’s crazy.
Her therapist thinks she’s suicidal.
Everyone else thinks she’s a dangerous drunk.
They’re all right–but did she see the killer?

As the anniversary of the murders approaches, Faith Winters is released from the psychiatric hospital and yanked back to the last spot on earth she wants to be–her hometown where the slayings took place. Wracked by the lingering echoes of survivor’s guilt, Faith spirals into a black hole of alcoholism and wanton self-destruction. Finding no solace at the bottom of a bottle, Faith decides to track down her sister’s killer–and then discovers that she’s the one being hunted.

I have found a new author I really, really like and will be reading more of his books in the near future. If you like gripping thrillers, check out Greyson’s The Girl Who Lived.

the girl who lived book cover

 

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