First Draft Fits

fountain pen on spiral notebook

I’ve written about the struggles of writing and finishing a first draft before, like just this January! I gave myself three months to get as much done as I could. The third month is just beginning.

I’ve written several more scenes, words, chapters, so at least I’ve been at it. But have I gotten far enough along according to what I’d challenged myself to do via my previous blog post: “…hoping the first draft will be done by the end of that time period. If not, at least it’ll be close”? Well, I’m closer, but with all the scenes that have popped in my head, the paths my characters have taken me…it’s been a good trek, heading toward the end goal, but I wouldn’t say I’m on the cusp of writing “THE END”.

My WIP, What She Didn’t Know, is nearly sixty thousand words so far and is written from three different third person point of views, and perhaps this is why it’s taking me longer.

Both my novel, Passage of Promise, and my novella, Mourning Dove, are from one third person point of view.

With three different points of view, there is so much more to write because you have three different people’s lives to build character ARCs and intertwine their lives into a main plot of sorts.

So, I started writing What She Didn’t Know January 14, 2018. And what I’d said before in my previous blog on this: “I blame my half-done piece on working on my other done pieces” I’ve still been doing! For shame!

I did some research on how long most authors take to write their first drafts. I’ve read anywhere from a few weeks to six months. This definitely spurred me into thinking, “What am I doing with my work in progress?!”

I’ve got to just focus on this piece and finish it!

I needed some encouragement, so I wandered around websites for authors’ comments on finishing the first draft, and this one by Shannon Hale, a young adult fantasy author, absolutely struck and inspired me. I love it:

“I’m writing a first draft and reminding myself that I’m simply shoveling sand into a box so that later I can build castles.” 

How long did it take you to write your first draft? What motivated you to get it done? If you’re not done, get to it! 😀

 

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The Soaring Heights of Living in the Writing Realm

book with green background sparkle

Do you know that feeling you get when you’re in the zone? You’ve stepped inside your main character’s world and swam through its tumultuous and rhythmic waves, quenching your thirst in the emotions and conflicts, joys and discoveries of your characters.

Your fingers agilely stamp the keys, and the words soar across the page like a plane boasting its fluttering banner streaking through a clear, azure sky.

sparkling rainbow gif

Ideas, colors, imagination, romance, twists, banter, sensations, explosive climaxes, and redemptive resolutions fall like confetti inside your depthless mind. You sweep them all into a bundle of joy and sprinkle them on the white pages on your story.

Nothing outside this make believe world exists while you’re in the zone.  You saver this moment of complete dedication, imagination, and concentration.  Little more than a nuclear bomb could shake you out of this realm.

But when you emerge smiling, mind clear as glass and heart swelled twice its size, you know writing fiction is your destiny.

Capture this moment again and again by reading over your work in progress’s chapters. It fuels the creative flame inside of you.

 

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Bogged Down in the Mechanics and Rules of Writing?

help key pic

Do you feel like all the writing rules are killing your creativity and ability to write?  If so, this blog post by Lauren Sapala is a must read:

 

STUCK WITH YOUR STORY? WHY YOU KEEP HITTING WALLS AND DEAD ENDS IN YOUR WRITING

For the longest time I had major problems doing revisions on my writing. It seemed so easy for everyone else. Why was it so hard for me? Of course, I also had trouble writing. I hardly ever experienced that state of “effortless flow” everyone talked about, in which the words just magically spewed out of me down onto the page. For years—a lot  of years—I felt like something was wrong with me. I felt like I was a failure as a writer.

Then, I discovered something.

It wasn’t that there was something wrong with me, it was that the way I approached my writing was all wrong. Traditional writing wisdom set out a bunch of rules that didn’t help me, that I knew. But what I didn’t realize was that traditional writing wisdom had also implanted a mindset within me that was completely distorted, a skewed perspective that didn’t fit at all into my personal growth as an artist.

For the rest, go here.

 

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